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Samuel J. Friedman Theatre Marquee

Samuel J. Friedman Theatre

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Ticket Information

Box Office Hours
Monday: 12:00 PM-6:00 PM
Tuesday–Saturday: 12:00 PM–30 minutes after evening curtain
Sunday: 12:00 PM-6:00PM
*Box office opens at 10:00 AM on matinee days.

Tickets
Purchase tickets online, at the theatre box office, or by phone 212-239-6200.

Group Tickets (10+)
Book online or call 800-714-8452.


Location


About This Theatre

The Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, originally the Biltmore, was the second theatre built by the Chanin Organization.

Designed by Herbert J. Krapp, the interior plan was unusual in that it sat slightly askew on the site and the auditorium was rectangular with a horseshoe at one end and the proscenium arch at the other. The ornamentation was in the Adamesque, or 18th century neoclassical, style used frequently by Krapp. In 1987 the interior of the theatre was destroyed by fire and remained vacant for 14 years until the Manhattan Theatre Club, a subscription-based nonprofit organization, rescued it and extensively renovated it. The theatre reopened in 2003 with Violet Hour. Five years later it was renamed for Samuel J. Friedman, the first theatrical press agent to have a theatre named in his honor. Dedicated to nurturing and promoting new American plays, the Manhattan Theatre Club has presented such productions as Rabbit HoleRecklessDoubt, and Time Stands Still.

My Name Is Lucy Barton is currently playing in the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre.

The Samuel J. Friedman has 650 seats and is Manhattan Theatre Club‘s only Broadway theatre.

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Policies

Dress Code
There is no dress code at the theatre. Formal attire is not required. For all performances, attire should be comfortable and appropriate for the occasion.

Children
Children younger than 4 will not be permitted in the theatre.

Late Seating
Latecomers will be seated at the discretion of management.


Amenities

Restrooms
Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are available on the lower level and Mezzanine level.

Cloakroom
A limited number of lockers are available at the theatre, subject to availability.

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Accessible Seating

Accessible seating is available for this performance as indicated on the seating map.

The entrance to the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre is located on street level at 261 West 47th Street (between Broadway and 8th Avenue). An elevator, located at the right of the Box Office lobby, provides easy access to all levels of the theatre, as well as the Susan and Peter J. Solomon Family Lounge (which has restrooms, concessions, coat lockers, and the MTC gift shop) and the Mezzanine lounge/restroom area.


Wheelchair-Accessible Restroom

Wheelchair-accessible restrooms available on lower level and Mezzanine level.


Seat Accessibility

Orchestra: There are steps between the rows in the Orchestra.

Premier Circle/Mezzanine (second level/third level): The entrance to the second level at row AA is up two flights of stairs (19 steps). The rear entrance to the second-level seating is considered the third level. It is up four flights of stairs (35 steps) from street level.


Assisted-Listening Devices

Assisted listening devices and hearing-aid-compatible devices are available free of charge on a first-come, first-served basis. At the Friedman, these devices are located at the podium to the left as you enter the inner lobby of the theatre. The house manager or staff on duty will provide you with a headset in exchange for a credit card, driver’s license, or other form of identification, which will be returned to you at the end of the performance. Please note: Headsets not obtained at the theatre will not work with our enhanced listening systems.

Audio Description
Audio description is available on-demand at any performance beginning three weeks after opening night. The pre-recorded audio description is delivered via a headset and a small receiver, using advanced technology to synchronize with the action on stage. The house manager or staff on duty will provide you with the equipment in exchange for a credit card, driver’s license, or other form of identification, which will be returned to you at the end of the performance. Devices are available free of charge on a first-come, first-served basis.

On-Demand Closed Captioning
Using the latest technology, closed captioning is now available on-demand at any performance at the Friedman Theatre, beginning three weeks after opening night. The action on stage is synchronized with captions on a small handheld device displaying in real time. The house manager or staff on duty will provide you with the equipment in exchange for a credit card, driver’s license, or other form of identification, which will be returned to you at the end of the performance. Devices are available free of charge on a first-come, first-served basis.

Braille and Large-Print Playbills
Manhattan Theatre Club will provide braille and large-print versions of all Playbills for audience members with vision impairments. At the Friedman, these are located at the podium to the left as you enter the inner lobby of the theatre.

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Samuel J. Friedman Theatre History imageOn September 4, 2008, the Biltmore Theatre, Broadway home of the nonprofit Manhattan Theatre Club, was rechristened the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre in recognition of the pioneering Broadway publicist. The glorious restoration of the Biltmore was the miracle of the 2003–2004 season. Dark since 1987, the 1925 landmark had been destroyed by fire and scavengers. MTC restored the theatre in partnership with Biltmore Theatre Associates, builders of an adjacent 51-story apartment tower. The restoration was designed by Polshek Partnership Architects.

MTC’s inaugural season included Drowning Crow with Alfre Woodard; The Violet Hour; and Sight Unseen. Subsequent productions: Reckless; Brooklyn Boy; After the Night and the Music; Absurd Person Singular; Rabbit Hole (Pulitzer Prize); Shining City; Losing Louie; Translations; LoveMusik; Mauritius; Come Back, Little Sheba; Top Girls; To Be or Not to Be; The American Plan; Accent on Youth; The Royal Family; Collected Stories with Linda Lavin and Sarah Paulson; Time Stands Still; The Pitmen Painters; Good People with Frances McDormand (Tony Award); Master Class with Tyne Daly; Wit; Venus in Fur with Nina Arianda (Tony Award); The Columnist with John Lithgow; An Enemy of the People; The Other Place with Laurie Metcalf; The Assembled Parties with Judith Light (Tony Award); The Snow Geese; Outside Mullingar with Debra Messing; Casa Valentina; The Country House; Constellations with Jake Gyllenhaal and Ruth Wilson; Airline Highway; Fool for Love; Our Mother’s Brief Affair; The Father with Frank Langella (Tony Award); Heisenberg with Mary-Louise Parker; August Wilson’s Jitney (Tony Award); Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes with Laura Linney and Cynthia Nixon (Tony Award); Prince of Broadway; The Children; Saint Joan; The Nap; Choir Boy; and Ink.

In the 1980s this theatre housed Honky Tonk Nights; The Boys of Winter; A Woman of Independent Means; Doonesbury; Whodunnit, A Talent for Murder; To Grandmother’s House We Go; The American Clock; and Nuts.

Highlights of the 1970s included Find Your Way Home; Knock, Knock; The Robber Bridegroom; Lily Tomlin in Appearing Nitely; and Claudette Colbert and Rex Harrison in The Kingfisher.

From 1952 to 1961, the Biltmore was leased to CBS. It returned to legitimacy with Elizabeth Ashley in Take Her, She’s Mine. Ashley returned in 1963 with Robert Redford in Barefoot in the Park.

Hair arrived in 1968 and ran for 1,750 performances.

In the 1940s, the Biltmore enjoyed three huge hits: My Sister Eileen with Shirley Booth, Kiss and Tell with Richard Widmark, and The Heiress with Wendy Hiller.

In the 1930s the Biltmore was taken over by the Federal Theatre Project for its Living Newspaper series, and then by Warner Brothers as a showcase for the productions of George Abbott. Two hit comedies resulted: Brother Rat, with Eddie Albert and José Ferrer, and What a Life, with Ezra Stone.

In 1926, Walter Huston starred in lurid melodrama Kongo, then returned the next year in The Barker, which also starred Claudette Colbert. She next played here in Tin Pan Alley. Mae West’s Pleasure Man, in which she did not appear, opened here in 1928 — and the police promptly closed it. 

Used with permission by Playbill, Inc. Playbill is a registered trademark.

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