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Flying Over Sunset

Lincoln Center Theater Plans to Reopen Productions in Spring 2021

Based on current information regarding COVID-19 and concern for the well-being and safety of its artists, audiences, and staff, Lincoln Center Theater, which had hoped to reopen its productions of the new opera Intimate Apparel at the Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater and the new musical Flying Over Sunset at the Vivian Beaumont Theater this fall, now plans to reopen both productions in spring 2021. The two productions were forced to suspend performances on March 12 when theaters were closed by Governor Andrew Cuomo as a precaution against the outbreak of the virus.

Exact dates for reopening have not yet been announced at this time.

Flying Over Sunset, with book and direction by James Lapine, music by Tom Kitt and lyrics by Michael Korie, featuring choreography by Michelle Dorrance, was scheduled to begin previews on Thursday, March 12, 2020, and was scheduled to open on Thursday, April 16, 2020.

Flying Over Sunset is inspired by real-life creative types Aldous Huxley (author of Brave New World), Clare Booth Luce (politician and author of the play The Women), and Cary Grant (movie star) who experimented with LSD during the 1950s. Before the drug was declared an illegal substance, many people partook in LSD. The musical will explore the effects the drug took on those who did. Flying Over Sunset brings all three of these personalities together and examines the journeys they take under the drug’s influence.

Intimate Apparel, with music by Ricky Ian Gordon, libretto by Lynn Nottage, based on her play, and direction by Bartlett Sher, began previews on Thursday, February 27, 2020, and had been scheduled to open Monday, March 23, 2020.

Set in 1905 in turn of the century New York, Intimate Apparel tells the story of Esther, a lonely, single African-American woman who makes her living sewing beautiful corsets and ladies’ undergarments. There is warm affection between her and the Orthodox Jewish man who sells fabrics to her, but any relationship between them, even a touch, is completely forbidden. Seeking love and romance, Esther eventually embarks on a letter-writing relationship with a mysterious suitor laboring on the Panama Canal. When he moves to New York they embark on an unhappy marriage, leading Esther to realize that only her self-reliance and certainty of her own worth will see her through life’s challenges.

Photo by Joan Marcus.